Event Title

A Multidisciplinary Lens

Location

Burnell 112

Start Time

16-5-2013 11:45 AM

End Time

16-5-2013 12:15 PM

Description

Using National Data to Compare Fatal and Non-Fatal Child Maltreatment

Dr. Emily Douglas
In 2010, 1,560 children, or 2.07 per 100,000 children in the United States died as a result of abuse or neglect. Maltreatment-related fatalities have received increasing attention in recent years, but there are still significant gaps in our knowledge of what places a child at-risk for fatal child maltreatment. This presentation will report on the results of a comparison of the child, family, and perpetrator characteristics and receipt of services among families substantiated for fatal and non-fatal child maltreatment using the 2010 National Child Abuse & Neglect Data Set. Results indicate that aside from child age, race and gender, perpetrator age, and financial and housing concerns, there were few differences between fatal and non-fatal victims. There were many more differences with regard to receipt of services. The families of fatal victims received far fewer services than non-fatal victims. Results will be discussed with regard to research and practice implications.

Child Abuse and the Aging Body in Irish Cultural Discourse

Dr. Kathleen Vejvoda
Since the clerical abuse scandal erupted in Ireland in the mid-1990s, journalistic and government investigations have revealed disturbing details of the physical and sexual abuse of children that took place in numerous institutions over many decades. Victims of childhood abuse, many of them in their fifties and older, have come forward only recently. Drawing on evidence from the 2009 Ryan Commission Report and subsequent news media coverage, this paper explores ways in which such testimonies and interviews have brought to light the abused child in the aging body, and how representations of the elderly have been inflected by this age slippage. The figure of the old man traditionally appears throughout ghost stories and horror films as an abuser endowed with supernatural agency. But in recent Irish films that invoke the trauma of childhood abuse, he has emerged as a more ambivalent figure, one who might signify the victim of abuse as well.

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May 16th, 11:45 AM May 16th, 12:15 PM

A Multidisciplinary Lens

Burnell 112

Using National Data to Compare Fatal and Non-Fatal Child Maltreatment

Dr. Emily Douglas
In 2010, 1,560 children, or 2.07 per 100,000 children in the United States died as a result of abuse or neglect. Maltreatment-related fatalities have received increasing attention in recent years, but there are still significant gaps in our knowledge of what places a child at-risk for fatal child maltreatment. This presentation will report on the results of a comparison of the child, family, and perpetrator characteristics and receipt of services among families substantiated for fatal and non-fatal child maltreatment using the 2010 National Child Abuse & Neglect Data Set. Results indicate that aside from child age, race and gender, perpetrator age, and financial and housing concerns, there were few differences between fatal and non-fatal victims. There were many more differences with regard to receipt of services. The families of fatal victims received far fewer services than non-fatal victims. Results will be discussed with regard to research and practice implications.

Child Abuse and the Aging Body in Irish Cultural Discourse

Dr. Kathleen Vejvoda
Since the clerical abuse scandal erupted in Ireland in the mid-1990s, journalistic and government investigations have revealed disturbing details of the physical and sexual abuse of children that took place in numerous institutions over many decades. Victims of childhood abuse, many of them in their fifties and older, have come forward only recently. Drawing on evidence from the 2009 Ryan Commission Report and subsequent news media coverage, this paper explores ways in which such testimonies and interviews have brought to light the abused child in the aging body, and how representations of the elderly have been inflected by this age slippage. The figure of the old man traditionally appears throughout ghost stories and horror films as an abuser endowed with supernatural agency. But in recent Irish films that invoke the trauma of childhood abuse, he has emerged as a more ambivalent figure, one who might signify the victim of abuse as well.