Title

Effects of a Ten-Week Periodized Resistance Training Program on Speed in High School Athletes

Publication Date

2016

Document Type

Abstract

Abstract

Strength and speed are important for athletes that perform change-of-direction sprinting. With limited pre-season time, quality short-term training is vital to high school athletes. Although inconsistent, research shows periodized resistance training (PRT) as most beneficial for athletes.

PURPOSE: To investigate the effectiveness of short-term PRT on speed and determine the relationship between relative strength and speed.

METHODS: Eighteen male high school football and soccer players were randomly assigned to either a PRT group (PRTG) or a control group (CG) after providing informed consent. Both groups were pre and post-tested on drills to assess speed (“Nebraska, “T”, and 20 m dash) and a 3-repetition maximum back squat to assess strength. The PRTG participated in a 10-week/3-day/week PRT program while the CG independently participated in their normal training routine. Five 2x2 ANOVAs were conducted (treatment/control vs. pretest/post test) with significance set at p < .05 to determine differences.

RESULTS: There was a significant difference (p

CONCLUSION: The 10 week short-term PRT did not elicit significant differences in change-of-direction speed in this sample of football and soccer players. Supported by the Adrian Tinsley Undergraduate Summer Research Program.

Original Citation

Pacheco, B. & Russell, P. (2016, June 3). Effects of a Ten-Week Periodized Resistance Training Program on Speed in High School Athletes. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 48(5S), 937. https://doi.org/10.1249/01.mss.0000487804.67246.ac