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Abstract

Studies on Igbo women have ignored the part played by either fear of women or respect for them in the evolution of festivals and some customary practices. Embedded in this neglect is the non-recognition of their contribution to the development of their societies. However, evidence that some cultural practices evolved out of fear of women and respect for them by the men abounds as manifest in the evolution of some spirit being institutions, memorialisation of women’s war exploits, and veneration of kola nut. Anchored on extensive field investigation, the application of historical narrative and qualitative research method, this study traced the origin of some Igbo customary practices, their gender origins and rationale for some observances. This research, it is hoped, would ensure that the very histories of such festivals and customs are preserved and the efforts of Igbo heroines past are not interred with their bones. Equally, the findings would mitigate the spate of denigration of women.

Note on the Author

Christian Chukwuma Opata (PhD), senior lecturer in the Department of History and International Studies, University of Nigeria, Nsukka is widely published.

Apex A Apeh (PhD) senior lecturer, Department of History and International Studies, Department of History and International Studies, University of Nigeria, Nsukka is published in many journals.

Asogwa Sylvanus Odoja (PhD) lectures in the Department of Fine and Applied Arts, University of Nigeria, Nsukka.

Alaku Emmanuel (PhD) is of the Department of History and Diplomatic Studies, Alex Ekwueme University, Abakiliki.

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