Title

Perceiving Race Relevance in Everyday Events: Target Race Matters, Perceiver Race Does Not

Publication Date

2013

Document Type

Article

Abstract

Perceptions of the relevance of race in everyday situations may matter for intergroup relations. Extending previous research, this work examines Blacks’ and Whites’ perceptions of race relevance in positive versus negative everyday situations affecting Black or White individuals. It also examines whether Black and White participants expect more intergroup disagreement regarding those perceptions than actually exists (i.e., interracial pluralistic ignorance). In Study 1, White participants saw significantly more race relevance in negative situations affecting Black (rather than White) individuals, whereas positive events seemed only marginally more race relevant when they featured Blacks. Study 2 replicated this pattern among White and Black participants. Furthermore, Study 2 uncovered interracial pluralistic ignorance: both Black and White participants expected to agree with their racial ingroup more than their racial outgroup, even though both groups reported similar race relevance perceptions. Participants’ own race relevance ratings and symbolic racist attitudes moderated the degree of expected disagreement

Original Citation

Betz, D.E., Ramsey, L.R., and Sekequaptewa, D. (2013). Perceiving Race Relevance in Everyday Events: Target Race Matters, Perceiver Race Does Not. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 16(6), 699-716. doi: 10.1177/1368430212474077

Identifier

doi: 10.1177/1368430212474077