Title

A Longitudinal Test of the Gender Turnover Model among U.S. House and Senate Members

Publication Date

2015

Document Type

Article

Abstract

This study builds on previous research by examining the impact of gender when predicting roll call voting behavior in the U.S. House and the U.S. Senate over several recent congresses. In order to unearth gender effects, it employs a longitudinal design based on turnover in the membership of both the House and the Senate. Through a comparison of the voting records of members of Congress representing the same geographic territory it holds constituency constantly while allowing for gender and party to vary. It does so with models including dependent variables that measure roll call ideology and support for women's issues exhibited in the voting records of members in both institutions. The results show that male and female members in each chamber representing the same constituency amass virtually indistinguishable voting records on the liberal-conservative policy dimension. However, on votes dealing with issues of concern to women, female senators tend to be more supportive than the male senators they replace and male senators tend to be less supportive than the female senators they replace.

Original Citation

Frederick, B. (2015). A Longitudinal Test of the Gender Turnover Model among U.S. House and Senate Members. The Social Science Journal, 52(2), 102-111. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soscij.2015.02.004