Title

Theoretical Analysis of Cyber-interpersonal Violence Victimization and Offending using Cyber-routine Activities Theory

Publication Date

2017

Document Type

Article

Abstract

The current study provides an empirical testing of the victim-offender overlap in online platforms due to the scarcity of studies examining this overlapping victim-offending dynamic. Two types of cyber-interpersonal violence are examined: Cyber-harassment (including cyber-sexual harassment) and cyber-impersonation. Using Choi's (2008) integrated theory of Cyber-Routine Activities Theory, a sample of 272 college students at a Massachusetts university are examined. Three major findings are revealed: (1) Respondents who engage in risky online leisure activities are more likely to experience interpersonal violence in cyberspace, (2) poor online security management can contribute to the likelihood of being victimized by interpersonal violence on social networking sites (SNS), and (3) respondents who engage in risky social networking site activities are likely to commit cyber-interpersonal violence. For the two types of cyber-interpersonal violence examined in this study, it could also be predicted that females are more likely to have higher levels of victimization. Cybersecurity management and sex had no significant effects on cyber-interpersonal violence offending. The hope is that education on the potential hazards of the Internet and of cyber-interpersonal violence will induce more responsible online activity and engagement.

Original Citation

Choi, K-S. & J.R. Lee. (2017). Theoretical Analysis of Cyber-interpersonal Violence Victimization and Offending using Cyber-routine Activities Theory. Computers in Human Behavior, 73, 394-402. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2017.03.061