Title

Health Problems of Partner Violence Victims: Comparing Help-seeking Men to a Population-based Sample

Publication Date

2015

Document Type

Article

Abstract

Background: National population-based studies show that 40%–50% of physical partner violence victims in a 1-year time period are men. However, studies assessing the health concerns related to partner violence victimization tend to focus on women, and none have assessed the health of male physical partner violence victims who sought help for their victimization.

Purpose: To understand men’s mental and physical health concerns that may be related to partner violence victimization.

Methods: In 2012-2013, two samples of men—611 physical partner violence victims who sought help and 1,601 men from a population-based sample—completed online questionnaires on their demographics, various types of partner violence victimization, physical health, mental health, and other risks. Data were analyzed using logistic regression, log binomial models, and robust Poisson models in 2013.

Results: In comparison to the population-based sample of men, male partner violence victims who sought help had significantly poorer health, particularly with regard to post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, high blood pressure, sexually transmitted diseases, and asthma. These differences remained after controlling for sample differences in demographics, substance use, previous traumatic exposure, and social support.

Conclusions: Practitioners should assess for health problems among partner violence victims and for partner violence victimization among men presenting with health problems.

Original Citation

Hines, D.A. & Douglas, E.M. (2015). Health Problems of Partner Violence Victims: Comparing Help-seeking Men to a Population-based Sample. American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 48(2), 136-144. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2014.08.022.