Title

From executive control to self-control: Predicting problem drinking among college students

Publication Date

2006

Document Type

Article

Abstract

This study tested whether individual differences in executive control can be used to predict problem drinking among college students. Performance on tests of executive control functions was contrasted in two groups of students. The groups were defined by how often they experienced negative consequences of drinking. The executive control measures included both objective and self-report measures from neuropsychological batteries, and a novel measure of working memory scanning that allowed us to test performance on theoretically dissociable executive functions. The students who experienced high levels of negative consequences of drinking made fast decisions, but they displayed high levels of interference from prepotent responses. In addition, the self-report measure of executive function was a very strong predictor of group membership.

Original Citation

Whitney P., Hinson J.M., Jameson T.L. (2006). From executive control to self-control: Predicting problem drinking among college students. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 20(6), 823-835. https://doi.org/10.1002/acp.1230