Title

Racial Differences in Job Attribute Preferences: The Role of Ethnic Identity and Self-Efficacy

Publication Date

2015

Document Type

Abstract

Abstract

Using a sample of 149 white and 190 black business students, the authors examine racial differences in job attribute preferences. As found in previous research (Brenner & Tomkiewicz, 1982), our study shows there were significant racial differences in 19 of 21 job attribute preferences, with black student placing greater importance on job attributes than white students. Further investigation of the mechanisms contributing to this difference reveals that the relationship between race and job attribute preferences could be fully explained by ethnic identity. Our examination of the relationship between ethnic identity and job attributes also shows that differing perceptions of personal efficacy leads to differential evaluations of job attributes, with those higher in self-efficacy placing greater importance of job attribute preferences. The suggested conceptualization of ethnic identity and self-efficacy, which was supported by the data, enhances our understanding of ethnic identity in relation to job attribute preference decision making processes.

Original Citation

Griffith, J. & Combs, G.M. (2015). Racial Differences in Job Attribute Preferences: The Role of Ethnic Identity and Self-Efficacy. Academy of Management Proceedings, 2015 (Meeting Abstract Supplement), 15401. https://doi.org/10.5465/AMBPP.2015.15401abstract