Title

Novice volleyball players’ knowledge of games, strategies, tactics, and decision-making in the context of game play

Publication Date

2006

Document Type

Article

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine novice volleyball players' domain-specific volleyball knowledge and how they used that knowledge to make tactical decisions during game play. Participants in this qualitative study were four college students enrolled in an elective basic instruction volleyball class at a large Northeastern university in the USA. Data were collected prior to and during participation in modified game play to examine participants' knowledge structures. Analysis of data shows that these novice participants had a range of domain-specific knowledge about setting up to attack in volleyball. Findings from this study indicate that participants were clearly novices in terms of their domain-specific knowledge development and use in game play (i.e., knowledge about solving the tactical problem of setting up to attack in volleyball). Implications of the study of novices' domain-specific knowledge can be applied to teaching physical education and to youth coaching.

Original Citation

Henninger, M. L., Pagnano, K. B., Patton, K., Griffin, L. L., & Dodds, P. (2006). Novice volleyball players’ knowledge of games, strategies, tactics, and decision-making in the context of game play. Journal of Physical Education New Zealand, 39(1), 34-46.