Title

Project Adventure and self concept of academically talented adolescent boys

Publication Date

2007

Document Type

Article

Abstract

This was a pilot study to examine the efficacy of an adventure based experience and self concept in academically talented adolescents. High school senior boys (N = 142) ages 16-17 years at a private school in the Boston area participated in a one-day Project Adventure course and took the Student Self-Concept Scale pre-intervention and postintervention and rated themselves on their self-confidence and the importance of self-concept attributes. Project Adventure is a series of group graded outdoor activities designed to challenge the participant and facilitate group problem solving. The scale measures adolescents' self-confidence and their performance expectations regarding behaviors or attributes in the areas of self-image, academic and social. The composite self-confidence score was significantly improved (p <. 001) at the conclusion of the experience. The students' evaluations of the importance of self-concept increased significantly for academic (p = .002) and social (p < .001) but not for self-image (p = .14). The outcome confidence scale measures the students' evaluations that their behavior will result in a specific outcome increased significantly for academic (p = .005) and social (p = .004) but not for self-image (p = .10). This was a pre-experimental (one group, pretest-posttest) design conducted as a pilot study in the area of academically talented students in a private school.

Original Citation

Graham, Louise B., Robinson, Ellyn M. (2007). Project Adventure and self concept of academically talented adolescent boys. Physical Educator, 64(3), 114-122.