Title

Close-interval core sampling: tests of a method for predicting internal site structure

Publication Date

1993

Document Type

Article

Abstract

Core sampling has often been used as a quick method of determining the presence or absence of prehistoric sites, although its accuracy and utility in locational studies have been rightly challenged. By taking multiple, close-interval (?2 m) core samples, however, patterns of soil disturbance emerge which are quantitatively useful in determining site structure. The results of close-interval core sampling at sites in central southern New England are compared with excavations at the same sites. In addition, comparisons with other minimally intrusive sampling methods are made. It is concluded that close-interval core sampling is a cost effective method of predicting within-site densities as an adjunct to investigations performed at or above the level necessary to nominate sites to the National Register of Historic Places.

Original Citation

Hoffman, C. (1993). Close-interval core sampling: tests of a method for predicting internal site structure. Journal of Field Archaeology, 20(4), 461-473.

Identifier

DOI: 10.2307/530075